Does color matter to a Greenback?

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  • Does color matter to a Greenback?

    By Chad Maloy

What’s the first thing your buddies ask after you put a piggy greenback on the ice? Probably the most asked question is, “what’s the hot color & what lure are you using?”

On Lake Winnipeg, we have had lots of success using lipless crankbaits in several different colors. My preference, when it comes to color choice, is using either natural or bright.

I have caught more master angler walleyes on a natural color like chrome or blue than any other color. One of the most popular lures is the LIVETARGET Golden Shiner lipless crankbait. It has an extremely lifelike paint job and could pass for a real baitfish. Other LIVETARGET lures that have been very successful include the crappie and bluegill.

The second direction would be a brightly colored lure such as the Northland Rippin’ Shad. This lure comes in several bright fish colors, including a selection of glows and metallic. One color that has worked very well is pink. For that reason, I am very excited to test the Glo Tiger Shrimp Rippin Shad this winter. LIVETARGET also added a few glow lures to the Golden Shiner line up, look for those before starting your season.

Glow and UV painted lures have been gaining in popularity the past few years, but what does it really mean when it says “glow” or “UV”? Lures, when painted with glow paints, act like a sponge by absorbing light, retaining that light and then emitting that light until the charge is done. Lures painted with a UV agent will reflect the light from the sun brighter than a lure without UV. This paint will make the lure brighter, causing it to stand out when light is low.

Ever have a lure that needs a color change or refinish? Every year I send a few lures off for a makeover with my friend Dave Harmon at Monsteyelures.com. Dave can put almost any custom paint pattern on your favorite lures. It could be a standard color pattern or you can create your own from scratch! You can send him new or well used lures. The cost typically runs anywhere from $5-$7 per lure, depending on the lure size, quantity ordered and color pattern you choose. 

This should help give you a good start when you are in the lure isle trying decide which color to pick out. Pick up a few natural colored lures and a few crazy bright ones and give them a try.